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Antibiotic Increases Risk of Blood and Lymph Cancer Relapse


On August 3, 2018, the FDA warned health care providers that the antibiotic azithromycin should not be given long-term to prevent a certain inflammatory lung condition in patients with cancers of the blood or lymph nodes who undergo a donor stem cell transplant. Results of a clinical trial found an increased rate of relapse in cancers affecting the blood and lymph nodes, including death, in these patients.

 

The serious lung condition for which long-term azithromycin was being studied, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, is caused by inflammation and scarring in the airways of the lungs, resulting in severe shortness of breath and dry cough. Cancer patients who undergo stem cell transplants from donors are at risk for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome.

 

Azithromycin is not approved for preventing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. It is an FDA-approved antibiotic used to treat many types of infections affecting the lungs, sinuses, skin, and other parts of the body. The drug has been used for more than 26 years. It is sold under the brand names Zithromax and Zmax and as generics by many different drug companies. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria that can cause infections.

 

The FDA advised health care professionals not to prescribe long-term azithromycin for prophylaxis of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome to patients who undergo donor stem cell transplants because of the increased potential for cancer relapse and death.

 

See the FDA Safety Alert

 

See the FDA Drug Safety Communication

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives Report: Chemotherapy: Risks and Liabilities When the Treatment Is Toxic

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives Report: Drugs, Dosage, and Damage: Physician Liability for Prescribing or Administering Medication 

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives Report: Off-Label Use of Prescriptions: When is this Medical Malpractice? Is the Pharmaceutical Company Liable for Overpromotion?

 

 

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