EMAIL TO A FRIEND COMMENT

 

Drug Approved to Treat Uncontrolled Diarrhea from Carcinoid Syndrome


On February 28, 2017, the FDA approved Xermelo (telotristat ethyl) tablets in combination with somatostatin analog (SSA) therapy for the treatment of adults with carcinoid syndrome diarrhea that SSA therapy alone has inadequately controlled.

 

Carcinoid syndrome is a cluster of symptoms sometimes seen in people with carcinoid tumors. Carcinoid tumors are rare, often slow-growing, neuroendocrine cancerous growths, which most often develop in the gastrointestinal tract. Carcinoid syndrome occurs in less than ten percent of patients with carcinoid tumors, usually after the tumor has spread to the liver. The tumors in these patients release excess amounts of the hormone serotonin, resulting in diarrhea. Complications of uncontrolled diarrhea include weight loss, malnutrition, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalance.

 

“Today’s approval will provide patients whose carcinoid syndrome diarrhea is not adequately controlled with another treatment option,” said Julie Beitz, M.D., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

 

Xermelo, in a regimen with SSA therapy, is approved in tablet form to be taken orally three times daily with food. Xermelo inhibits the production of serotonin by carcinoid tumors and reduces the frequency of carcinoid syndrome diarrhea.

 

The most common side effects of Xermelo include nausea, headache, increased levels of the liver enzyme gamma-glutamyl transferase, depression, accumulation of fluid causing swelling (peripheral edema), flatulence, decreased appetite, and fever. Xermelo may cause constipation, and the risk of developing constipation may be increased in patients whose bowel movement frequency is less than four bowel movements per day. Patients treated with a higher than recommended dosage of Xermelo developed severe constipation in clinical trials. One patient required hospitalization and two other patients developed complications of either intestinal perforation or intestinal obstruction. Patients should be monitored for severe constipation.

 

The FDA granted this application fast track designation and priority review. The drug also received orphan drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

 

See the FDA Announcement

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, December 2016 Report: Gut-Wrenching Pain: Liability Risks Related to Gastrointestinal Disorders

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, May 2015 Report: Chemotherapy: Risks and Liabilities When the Treatment Is Toxic

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, May 2013 Report: Drugs, Dosage, and Damage: Physician Liability for Prescribing or Administering Medication

 

 

REPRINTS & PERMISSIONS COMMENT