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FDA Approves At-Home Genetic Test for Bloom Syndrome; Clears Path For Similar Tests


The FDA authorized for marketing 23andMe’s Bloom Syndrome carrier test, a direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic test to determine whether a healthy person has a variant in a gene that could lead to their offspring inheriting the serious disorder. Along with this authorization, the FDA is also classifying carrier screening tests as class II. In addition, the FDA intends to exempt these devices from FDA premarket review. The agency plans to issue a notice that announces the intent to exempt these tests and that provides a 30-day period for public comment. This action creates the least burdensome regulatory path for autosomal recessive carrier screening tests with similar uses to enter the market.

 

Bloom syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by short stature, sun-sensitive skin changes, an increased risk of cancer, and other health problems. People with Bloom syndrome have low birth weight and length. They remain much shorter and thinner than others in their family, growing to an adult height of less than five feet. Affected individuals usually develop dilated blood vessels and reddening in the skin, particularly in response to sun exposure. These changes typically appear as a butterfly-shaped patch of reddened skin across the nose and cheeks. The skin changes may also affect the hands and arms. People with Bloom syndrome have an increased risk of cancer. They can develop any of the cancers found in the general population, but the cancers arise unusually early in life, and affected individuals often develop more than one type of cancer.

 

Individuals with this disorder often have a high-pitched voice and distinctive facial features including a long, narrow face; a small lower jaw; a large nose; and prominent ears. Other features affecting some people with Bloom syndrome include learning disabilities, an increased risk of diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and recurrent infections of the upper respiratory tract, ears, and lungs during infancy. Men with Bloom syndrome usually do not produce sperm, and as a result are unable to father children (infertile). Women with the disorder generally have reduced fertility and experience menopause earlier than usual.

 

“The FDA believes that in many circumstances it is not necessary for consumers to go through a licensed practitioner to have direct access to their personal genetic information. Today’s authorization and accompanying classification, along with FDA’s intent to exempt these devices from FDA premarket review, supports innovation and will ultimately benefit consumers,” said Alberto Gutierrez, Ph.D., director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “These tests have the potential to provide people with information about possible mutations in their genes that could be passed on to their children.”

 

In general, carrier testing is a type of genetic testing performed on people who display no symptoms for a genetic disorder but may be at risk for passing it on to their children. A carrier for a genetic disorder has inherited one normal and one abnormal allele for a gene associated with the disorder. A child must inherit two abnormal alleles, one copy from each parent, in order for symptoms to appear.

 

No test is perfect. Given the probability of erroneous results and the rarity of these mutations, professional societies typically recommend that only prospective parents with a family history of a genetic disorder undergo carrier screening. For example, when a gene mutation is expected to be very rare, a positive result for the mutation may have a high probability of being wrong.

 

While the FDA is not limiting who should or should not use these tests, it is requiring that the company explain to the consumer in the product labeling what the results might mean for prospective parents interested in seeing if they carry a genetic disorder. If sold over the counter, the FDA is also requiring 23andMe to provide information to consumers about how to obtain access to a board-certified clinical molecular geneticist or equivalent to assist in pre- and post-test counseling.

 

The test is intended only for postnatal carrier screening in adults of reproductive age, and the results should be used in conjunction with other available laboratory and clinical information for any medical purposes.

 

See the FDA Announcement

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, November 2014 Report: More Than Skin Deep: Skin Cancer Misdiagnosis and Other Liability Issues

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, October 2012 Report: Mistakes in Diagnosing Cancer: Liability Concerns for Misdiagnosis, Failure to Diagnose, and Delayed Diagnosis

 

 

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