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FDA Finds Heightened Blood Clot Risk from Birth Control Pills Containing Drospirenone


The FDA has completed its review of recent observational (epidemiologic) studies regarding the risk of blood clots in women taking drospirenone-containing birth control pills. Based on this review, the FDA has concluded that drospirenone-containing birth control pills may be associated with a higher risk for blood clots than other progestin-containing pills.

 

Drospirenone is a synthetic version of the female hormone, progesterone, also referred to as a progestin. The FDA is requiring the addition of information about the studies to the labels of drospirenone-containing birth control pills.
 
The revised drug labels will report that some epidemiologic studies reported as high as a three-fold increase in the risk of blood clots for drospirenone-containing products when compared to products containing levonorgestrel or some other progestins, whereas other epidemiological studies found no additional risk of blood clots with drospirenone-containing products.  The labels also will include a summary of the previously released results of an FDA-funded study of the blood clot risk.


Women should talk to their healthcare professional about their risk for blood clots before deciding which birth control method to use. Healthcare professionals should consider the risks and benefits of drospirenone-containing birth control pills and a woman’s risk for developing a blood clot before prescribing these drugs.

 

See the FDA Safety Alert

 

 

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