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Hyoscyamine Sulfate Recalled Due to Superpotent and Subpotent Test Results


On September 15, 2016 Virtus Pharmaceuticals Opco II, LLC of Tampa, FL, is voluntarily recalling seven batches of Hyoscyamine sulfate (0.125mg) to the consumer level which include the tablet, sublingual, and orally disintegrating tablet form. This recall is being initiated due to both superpotent and subpotent test results. All of these batches were manufactured by Pharmatech LLC for distribution by Virtus throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.

 

Taking a product that is superpotent could result in hot/dry skin, fever, blurred vision, sensitivity to light, dry mouth, unusual excitement, fast or irregular heartbeat, dizziness, an inability to completely empty the bladder, and seizures. The severity of the adverse event would depend on how superpotent the tablet was. Adverse events such as clotted blood within the tissues and fractures could occur, as a result of falls from dizziness or seizures if the strength is particularly high.

 

To date, Virtus has received three adverse event reports involving hallucinations, stroke-like symptoms, confusion, dizziness, blurred vision, dry mouth, slurred speech, imbalance, and disorientation. These symptoms were reported to be resolved and are all believed to be temporary. None of the adverse events were life threatening, and the patients who reported the incidents were treated and released.

 

Hyoscyamine sulfate is an anticholinergic agent which blocks the action of acetylcholine and is used to treat diseases like asthma, incontinence, stomach cramps, peptic ulcers, and control gastric secretion, intestinal spasm and other bowel disturbances. These products were distributed Nationwide in the U.S. and Puerto Rico starting on March 11, 2016, to distributors, hospitals, and retail pharmacies.

 

See the FDA Safety Alert

 

See the Recall

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, May 2013 Report: Drugs, Dosage, and Damage: Physician Liability for Prescribing or Administering Medication 

 

 

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