EMAIL TO A FRIEND COMMENT

 

New Drug for Advanced Basal Cell Skin Cancer


The FDA approved Odomzo (sonidegib) to treat patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma that has recurred following surgery or radiation therapy, or who are not candidates for surgery or radiation therapy.

 

Skin cancer is the most common cancer and basal cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 80 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers. Basal cell carcinoma starts in the top layer of the skin (called the epidermis) and usually develops in areas that have been regularly exposed to the sun and other forms of ultraviolet radiation. According to the National Cancer Institute, the number of new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer appears to be increasing every year. Locally advanced basal cell skin cancer refers to basal cancers that have not spread to other parts of the body, but cannot be curatively treated with local treatments, specifically surgery and radiation.

 

Odomzo is a pill taken once a day. It works by inhibiting a molecular pathway, called the Hedgehog pathway, which is active in basal cell cancers. By suppressing this pathway, Odomzo may stop or reduce the growth of cancerous lesions.

 

“Our increasing understanding of molecular pathways involved in cancer has led to approvals of many oncology drugs in difficult-to-treat diseases for which few therapeutic options previously existed,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Thanks to a better understanding of the Hedgehog pathway, the FDA has now approved two drugs for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma just in the last three years.” In 2012, Erivedge (vismodegib), marketed by Genentech, was the first drug approved to treat locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

 

Odomzo carries a Boxed Warning alerting healthcare professionals that Odomzo may cause death or severe birth defects in a developing fetus when administered to a pregnant woman. Pregnancy status should be verified prior to the start of Odomzo treatment, and both male and female patients should be warned about these risks and advised to use effective contraception.

 

At a dose of 200 mg daily, the most common side effects of Odomzo were muscle spasms, alopecia (hair loss), dysgeusia (distortion in the sense of taste), fatigue, nausea, musculoskeletal pain, diarrhea, decreased weight, decreased appetite, myalgia (muscle pain), abdominal pain, headache, pain, vomiting, and pruritus (itching). Odomzo also has the potential to cause serious musculoskeletal-related side effects, including increased serum creatine kinase levels [with rare reports of muscle tissue breakdown (rhabdomyolysis)], muscle spasms, and myalgia.

 

See the FDA Announcement

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, May 2015 Report: Chemotherapy: Risks and Liabilities When the Treatment Is Toxic

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, November 2014 Report: More Than Skin Deep: Skin Cancer Misdiagnosis and Other Liability Issues

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, May 2013 Report: Drugs, Dosage, and Damage: Physician Liability for Prescribing or Administering Medication

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, October 2012 Report: Mistakes in Diagnosing Cancer: Liability Concerns for Misdiagnosis, Failure to Diagnose, and Delayed Diagnosis

 

See the Medical Law Perspectives June 29, 2015, Blog: Failure to Diagnose Cancer Claims Face Hurdles, Especially in New York 

 

See the Medical Law Perspectives November 25, 2014, Blog: Skin Cancer Incidence Rises; Surgeon General Issues Call to Action 

 

See the Medical Law Perspectives November 24, 2014, Blog: CDC Study Shows Skyrocketing Skin Cancer Costs; What Lawyers Can Learn By Examination and Persuasive Presentation of Statistics

 

 

REPRINTS & PERMISSIONS COMMENT