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Older Diabetics Likely to Reduce or Delay Medication to Save Money


On June 30, 2017, the CDC published a report that found diabetic adults aged 45–64 years who were prescribed any medication were almost twice as likely as those without diabetes to have reduced or delayed medication (18.8% compared with 9.6%) to save money in the past 12 months.

 

Adults with diabetes were more likely to reduce or delay medication in three different ways. The most frequently used method was to delay filling a prescription (16.3% compared with 7.9%). The second most frequently used method was to take less medication (14.4% compared with 6.9%). The third most frequently used method was to skip medication doses (13.2% compared with 6.4%).

 

Among adults 65 or older, those with diabetes were more likely than those without diabetes to reduce or delay medication (6.8% compared with 4.7%). Diabetics 65 or older used each of the three cost-saving measures at approximately the same rate.

 

Regardless of diabetes status, among adults who were prescribed medication, those aged 45–64 years were more likely than those 65 or older to reduce or delay taking medication to save money. Delaying filling a prescription was slightly more frequently used as a method to save money then taking less medication or skipping medication doses, which occurred at approximately the same rate.

 

See the CDC Report

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives Report: Diabetes and Its Complications: Malpractice and Other Liability Issues

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives Report: Drugs, Dosage, and Damage: Physician Liability for Prescribing or Administering Medication

 

 

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