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Serious Skin Reactions from Anti-seizure Drug


The FDA warned the public that the anti-seizure drug Onfi (clobazam) can cause rare but serious skin reactions that can result in permanent harm and death. The FDA approved changes to the Onfi drug label to add information about the risk for serious skin reactions to the Warnings and Precautions section and to the Medication Guide.

 

Patients taking Onfi should seek immediate medical treatment if they develop a rash, blistering or peeling of the skin, sores in the mouth, or hives. Patients should not stop taking Onfi without first talking to their health care professionals. Stopping Onfi suddenly can cause serious withdrawal problems, such as seizures that will not stop, hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that are not real), shaking, nervousness, and stomach or muscle cramps. Health care professionals should discontinue use of Onfi and consider an alternate therapy at the first sign of rash, unless it is clearly not drug-related.

 

These rare but serious skin reactions, called Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), can occur at any time during Onfi treatment. However, the likelihood of skin reactions is greater during the first eight weeks of treatment or when Onfi is stopped and then re-started. All cases of SJS and TEN in the FDA case series have resulted in hospitalization, one case resulted in blindness, and one case resulted in death.

 

Stevens-Johnson syndrome begins with flu-like symptoms, followed by a painful red or purplish rash that spreads and blisters, eventually causing the top layer of skin to die and shed. Stevens-Johnson syndrome presents a medical emergency that usually requires hospitalization. Treatment focuses on eliminating the underlying cause, controlling symptoms and minimizing complications. Recovery after Stevens-Johnson syndrome can take weeks to months. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a more severe form and involves sloughing of more than 30 percent of the body surface area.

 

Onfi is a benzodiazepine medication used in combination with other medicines to treat seizures associated with a severe form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome. Serious skin reactions have not generally been associated with other benzodiazepines. Clobazam is approved as an adjunctive treatment for patients two years and older with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. From drug approval in October 2011 through September 2013 approximately 31,000 patients received a dispensed prescription for this drug. It has been marketed outside the US for about 40 years under various brand names for the treatment of anxiety and seizures.

 

See the FDA Drug Safety Communication

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, May 2013 Report: Drugs, Dosage, and Damage: Physician Liability for Prescribing or Administering Medication

 

 

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