EMAIL TO A FRIEND COMMENT

 

Thousands of Public Pools, Hot Tubs Closed Due to Violations


Every year, serious health and safety violations force thousands of public pools, hot tubs, and water playgrounds to close, according to a CDC report. Swimming is a great way to exercise and spend time with family and friends but, as with any form of exercise, there are risks. Inspections of public pools and other aquatic venues enforce standards that can prevent illness, drowning, and pool-chemical–associated injuries such as poisoning or burns.

 

“No one should get sick or hurt when visiting a public pool, hot tub, or water playground,” said Beth Bell, M.D., M.P.H., director of the CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. “That’s why public health and aquatics professionals work together to improve the operation and maintenance of these public places so people will be healthy and safe when they swim.”

 

Inspection data were collected in 2013 in the five states with the most public pools and hot tubs: Arizona, California, Florida, New York, and Texas. Researchers reviewed data on 84,187 routine inspections of 48,632 public aquatic venues, including pools, hot tubs, water playgrounds and other places where people swim in treated water.

 

Among the key findings:

 

  • Most inspections of public aquatic venues (almost 80 percent) identified at least one violation.
  • 1 in 8 inspections resulted in immediate closure because of serious health and safety violations.
  • 1 in 5 kiddie/wading pools were closed—the highest proportion of closures among all inspected venues.
  • The most common violations reported were related to improper pH (15 percent), safety equipment (13 percent), and disinfectant concentration (12 percent).

 

“Environmental health practitioners, or public health inspectors, play a very important role in protecting public health. However, almost one third of local health departments do not regulate, inspect, or license public pools, hot tubs, and water playgrounds,” said Michele Hlavsa, R.N., M.P.H., chief of CDC’s Healthy Swimming Program. “We should all check for inspection results online or on site before using public pools, hot tubs, or water playgrounds and do our own inspection before getting into the water.”

 

Before CDC-led development of the Model Aquatic Health Code, there were no national standards for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance practices to prevent illness and injury at public treated recreational water venues. Now, local and state authorities can voluntarily adopt these science- and best practices–based guidelines to make swimming and other activities at public pools and other aquatic venues healthier and safer. The second edition of the code will be released during the 2016 swim season.

 

See the CDC Announcement

 

See the Model Aquatic Health Code

 

 

REPRINTS & PERMISSIONS COMMENT