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Viekira Pak Approved to Treat Hepatitis C


The FDA approved Viekira Pak (ombitasvir, paritaprevir, and ritonavir tablets co-packaged with dasabuvir tablets) to treat patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection, including those with a type of advanced liver disease called cirrhosis.

 

Hepatitis C is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the liver that can lead to reduced liver function, liver failure, or liver cancer. Most people infected with HCV have no symptoms of the disease until liver damage becomes apparent, which may take decades. According to the CDC, about 3.2 million Americans are infected with HCV, and without proper treatment, 15 to 30 percent of these people will go on to develop cirrhosis which may lead to death.

 

Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with the Hepatitis C virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. Today, most people become infected with the Hepatitis C virus by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, Hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants.

 

Viekira Pak contains three new drugs—ombitasvir, paritaprevir, and dasabuvir—that work together to inhibit the growth of HCV. It also contains ritonavir, a previously approved drug, which is used to increase blood levels of paritaprevir. Viekira Pak can be used with or without ribavirin, but it is not recommended for patients whose liver is unable to function properly.

 

“The new generation of therapeutics for hepatitis C virus is changing the treatment paradigm for Americans living with the disease,” said Edward Cox, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Office of Antimicrobial Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “We continue to see the development of new all-oral treatments with very high virologic response rates and improved safety profiles compared to some of the older interferon-based drug regimens.”

 

See the FDA Announcement

 

See also Medical Law Perspectives, September 2014 Report: Hepatitis: Provider Malpractice and Patient Injury

 

 

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