Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: December 10, 2012

IN THE NEWS


Large Dose Anti-Nausea Drug Zofran Taken Off Market Due to Potential for Serious Cardiac Risks

The FDA is notifying health care professionals that the 32 mg, single intravenous (IV) dose of the anti-nausea drug Zofran (ondansetron hydrochloride) can no longer be marketed because of the potential for serious cardiac risks. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Unsafe Injection Practices Expose Patients to Bloodborne Illnesses, Like Hepatitis and HIV, and to Life-Threatening Bacterial Infections

More than 150,000 patients have been impacted by unsafe injection practices since 2001. Breakdowns in proper infection control often involve providers reusing needles, syringes or single-dose medication vials, all of which are meant for one patient and one procedure. Click title to continue reading...



Cholesterol Atorvastatin Calcium Tablets Recalled Due to Potential Presence of Glass Particles

Forty-one affected lots of Atorvastatin Calcium Tablets (10 mg, 20 mg and 40 mg) which is a solid oral dosage form have been recalled because they may contain very small glass particles resembling a fine grain of sand (less than 1 mm in size). Click title to continue reading...



Video Laryngoscope Reusable Blades Recalled Due to Risk of Airway Obstruction from Tip Breakage

GlideScope GVL Video Laryngoscopes reusable blades that were manufactured between December 2010 and August 2011 have been recalled because they have been found to be prone to developing cracks and/or breaking across the tip of the blade, which potentially could result in pieces of the blade breaking off in patient’s mouths and obstructing the airway or being swallowed. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Hospital Contracting with Companies to Provide Doctors Did Not Enter Joint Venture; Hospital Not Vicariously Liable for Hospitalist and Surgeon Acts

A man was admitted to a hospital where he was treated by a hospitalist. While the hospitalist was on vacation, his substitute hospitalist referred the man to a surgeon. The surgeon performed exploratory surgery. Click title to continue reading...



Prohibiting Medical Negligence Plaintiff’s Attorney from Analogizing to BP’s Destruction of Evidence After Gulf Oil Spill Did Not Abuse Discretion

A woman suffered from cervical dystonia. She learned that a clinic offered a new treatment for dystonia called deep-brain stimulation (DBS). DBS involves a surgeon implanting electrodes in the brain to block brain impulses that cause the dystonia. The woman elected to undergo the surgery. Click title to continue reading...



Skilled Nursing Home and Healthcare Company Responsible for Operations Subject to Direct Liability Under Pennsylvania Corporate Negligence

A resident of a nursing home received care for a number of ailments. She was susceptible to urinary tract infections. She was admitted to a hospital with another urinary tract infection, dehydration, malnutrition, bedsores, and an acute myocardial infarction.  Click title to continue reading...