Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: November 11, 2013

IN THE NEWS


Infant Acetaminophen Recalled; Unmarked Oral Syringes; Overdose Potential

Eighteen batches of Perrigo’s acetaminophen infant suspension liquid under various drug store and grocery store brand labels was recalled because the packages may contain an oral dosing syringe without dose markings. Using an oral syringe without dose markings can result in inaccurate dosing, especially in infants who could mistakenly get too high a dose. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Leukemia Drug Sales Suspended; Potential for Fatal Blood Clotting

The FDA has asked Ariad Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of the leukemia chemotherapy drug Iclusig (ponatinib), to suspend marketing and sales of Iclusig because of the risk of life-threatening blood clots and severe narrowing of blood vessels. Click title to continue reading...



New Boxed Warning for Anti-Seizure Drug; Potential for Vision Loss

The FDA approved changes to the drug label of the anti-seizure drug Potiga (ezogabine), underscoring risks of abnormalities to the retina in the eye, potential vision loss, and blue skin discoloration, all of which may become permanent. Click title to continue reading...



Malaria Cases in U.S. Reach 40-Year High

The CDC, on October 31, 2013, updated information on Malaria in the U.S. noting that in 2011, 1,925 malaria cases were reported in the United States, according to data published in a supplement of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) released by the CDC. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Nursing Home Patient Not Bound by Arbitration Agreement Daughter Signed

After suffering a stroke, a woman was admitted to a skilled nursing facility. During the admissions process, the woman’s daughter signed a number of documents including an arbitration agreement. While at the facility, the woman was sexually assaulted and contracted a sexually transmitted disease. Click title to continue reading...



Knowledge, Not Title, Qualified Gastroenterologist as Causation Expert

A man suffered from dysphagia (difficulty swallowing). A gastroenterologist treated his dysphagia by inserting a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) feeding tube. The PEG feeding tube perforated the man's small bowel. Following the procedure, the man experienced severe abdominal pain and a distended abdomen. Click title to continue reading...



Johnson & Johnson Pays $2.2 Billion for False Claims, Kickbacks, Off-Label Sales

Global health care giant Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and its subsidiaries agreed to pay more than $2.2 billion to resolve criminal and civil liability arising from allegations relating to the prescription drugs Risperdal, Invega and Natrecor, including promotion for uses not approved as safe and effective by the FDA and payment of kickbacks to physicians and to the nation’s largest long-term care pharmacy provider. Click title to continue reading...