Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: July 14, 2014

IN THE NEWS


Neurology Tubing May Separate; Serious Brain Injury or Death

The FDA notified healthcare professionals particularly associated with neurology/neurosurgery of a Class I recall of the Medtronic Duet External Drainage and Monitoring System. The firm recalled the device because the patient line tubing may separate from the patient line connectors. According to the firm, the patient line is more likely to disconnect during frequent handling, such as connections where injections or sampling may frequently occur. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Injectable Coumadin Recalled Due to Particulates; Possible Patient Injury

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company recalled six lots of Coumadin for Injection, 5 mg single-use vials in the U.S. This recall is based on the company's investigation of visible particulate matter found in a small number of Coumadin for Injection unreleased samples. Click title to continue reading...



FDA Seeks Permanent Injunction; Distribution of Unapproved Vaginal Drugs

On June 25, the U.S. Department of Justice, at the request of the FDA, filed a complaint for permanent injunction in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California against Laclede, Inc. (Laclede) of Rancho Dominguez, California, and its president. The complaint claims that Laclede illegally distributes over-the-counter vaginal drug products without required FDA approval. Click title to continue reading...



Overprescribing Painkillers Varies Widely Among States

Health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid painkillers in 2012 – many more in some states than in others – according to a report released recently by the CDC that highlights the danger of overdose. The report also has an example of a state that reversed its overdose trend. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Continuous Treatment Did Not Apply to Failure to Diagnose Heart Disease

A man became a patient of a medical practice group at the age of 74. He visited the practice group periodically for monitoring of his blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which were generally well-controlled, and otherwise only went to the practice group for unrelated acute health issues. About six years later he terminated his relationship with them and, shortly thereafter, he suffered a massive heart attack, was diagnosed with coronary artery disease, and underwent bypass surgery. He died about a year and a half after terminating his relationship with the medical practice group. Click title to continue reading...



Expert on Pneumonia and Sepsis Hospitalization Criteria Not Misleading

A woman sought treatment at an emergency room. She complained of a severe cough, upper respiratory infection, and difficulty breathing. An emergency room doctor evaluated her and diagnosed her as suffering from bilateral pneumonia. While in the emergency room, she was administered intravenous antibiotics and saline, inhalation treatments, cough medication, and Tylenol. After she spent approximately three and one-half hours in the emergency room, the doctor noted her condition had improved and discharged her with care instructions and with prescriptions for an antibiotic, a cough syrup with codeine, and an inhaler. Click title to continue reading...



Controversy Existed On Insurer’s Duty to Indemnify Malpractice Action

A doctor served as a temporary attending physician for full-time rotations in a hospital’s pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) as part of an agreement to assist the hospital with a staffing shortage in the PICU. A former patient initiated a medical malpractice action against the doctor and others for damages allegedly incurred as a result of negligent treatment she received at the PICU. Click title to continue reading...