Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: August 18, 2014

IN THE NEWS


Injury Associated with Off Label Use of Intranasal Splint as Dermal Filler

Expression, manufactured by Enhancement Medical LLC, is listed with the FDA as an intranasal splint, and is intended to minimize bleeding and swelling and to prevent adhesions (sticking together) between the septum and the nasal cavity. Intranasal splints are placed in the nasal cavity after surgery or trauma and are usually constructed from plastic, silicone, or absorbent material. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Nationwide Recall of Cubicin; Particulate Matter in Reconstituted Vials

Nine lots of Cubicin (daptomycin for injection) 500 mg in 10 mL single use vials are being recalled to the user level following complaints of foreign particulate matter in reconstituted vials. The administration of particulate matter, if present in an intravenous drug, poses a potential safety risk to patients such as a thromboembolism or a life-threatening pulmonary embolism. Other events such as phlebitis, mechanical block of the capillaries or arterioles, activation of platelets, or subsequent generation of microthrombi are also possible. Click title to continue reading...



Stimulant Found in Diet Drug; Possible Risk for Cardiovascular Injury

RegeneSlim appetite control dietary supplement has been subject to a nationwide recall because FDA analysis confirmed the presence of DMAA. DMAA is also known as 1,3-dimethylamylamine, methylhexanamine, or geranium extract. DMAA is commonly used as a stimulant, pre-workout, and weight loss ingredient in dietary supplement products. The FDA has warned that DMAA is potentially dangerous to health as it can narrow blood vessels and arteries, which can cause a rise in blood pressure or other cardiovascular problems such as shortness of breath, arrhythmias, tightening in the chest, and heart attack. Click title to continue reading...



Heat Stress Kills Workers

Exposure to heat and hot environments puts workers at risk for heat stress, which can result in heat illnesses and death. Guidance for prevention exists, but heat illness prevention programs are not formally implemented by most employers. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Alzheimer's Patient Not Liable for Injuries To Home Caregiver

A man contracted with a home health care agency to assist with his 85-year-old wife, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease. The agency assigned a caregiver to work in their home. The caregiver was trained to care for Alzheimer's patients and had done so in other assignments. She knew they could be violent. The husband told her that his wife was combative and would bite, kick, scratch, and flail. The caregiver's duties included supervising, bathing, dressing, and transporting the wife, as well as some housekeeping. Click title to continue reading...



Common Knowledge Exception to Expert Affidavit Applied for Latex Allergy

A woman was admitted to the hospital for an uvulopalatopharyngoplasy, a procedure used to treat sleep apnea. Prior to the surgery, the woman’s latex allergy was disclosed to medical personnel on her forms for “Pre-Anesthesia Evaluation” and “Consent to Operation, Anesthetic and Other Medical Services.” Prior to surgery, the hospital issued her a wrist band that identified the latex allergy. During the surgery, she suffered an allergic reaction that required her to be treated in the Intensive Care Unit (“ICU”). The woman attributed the reaction to her latex allergy. Click title to continue reading...



LTD Benefits Plan Found Vitamin Supplements Were Medical Treatment

The president of a company was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive eye disease that can eventually lead to blindness. At his doctor's direction and under his doctor's supervision, he took 15,000 units a day of a non-prescribed, over-the-counter vitamin A palmitate supplement. Though his vitamin A supplements could not cure his retinitis pigmentosa, they could slow the disease's rate of progression. Click title to continue reading...