Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: February 16, 2015

IN THE NEWS


Undeclared Nuts Force Multi-State Bagel Recall

Bimbo Bakeries USA of Horsham, Pennsylvania, recalled Thomas’, Sara Lee, and Jewel Bagels because they may contain unlisted peanuts and almonds. People who have allergies to peanuts and almonds run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume the products. The recall was initiated after the bakery that produced the product discovered that peanuts and almonds were present in an ingredient used for the bagels. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


FDA Approves First Tissue Adhesive for Internal Use

TissuGlu is a urethane-based tissue adhesive that a surgeon can use to connect tissue flaps made during surgery to remove excess fat and skin or to restore weakened or separated abdominal muscles (abdominoplasty surgery). Connecting the tissue flaps with an internal adhesive may reduce or eliminate the need for postoperative surgical draining of fluid between the abdominoplasty (tummy-tuck) tissue flaps. Click title to continue reading...



FDA Clears Device to Reduce Stroke Risk During Stent and Angioplasty Procedures

The FDA cleared for marketing the ENROUTE Transcarotid Neuroprotection System (ENROUTE TNS), for use during a minimally invasive procedure to restore normal blood flow to narrowed carotid arteries. It is the first device designed to access the carotid arteries through an incision in the neck, instead of the groin, and uses a blood flow reversal system to capture pieces of the blockage dislodged during the procedure. Click title to continue reading...



58 Million Nonsmokers Still Exposed to Secondhand Smoke

Although secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in the United States dropped by half between 1999 to 2000 and 2011 to 2012, one in four nonsmokers -- 58 million people -- are still exposed to SHS, according to a new report from the CDC. No level of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is safe. SHS exposure occurs when nonsmokers breathe in smoke exhaled by smokers or from burning tobacco products. It kills more than 400 infants and 41,000 adult nonsmokers every year. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Hospital Immune for Refusing Admission to Suicidal Teen

A seventeen-year-old boy presented to a hospital’s emergency room seeking to be admitted for voluntary inpatient mental health treatment. A licensed professional counselor performed an initial mental-health assessment of the teen. A medical doctor also performed a physical screening on the boy. Both agreed that he should be admitted to the mental-health-care unit. The boy spent most of the day awaiting admission to the hospital's inpatient mental-health-care unit. Click title to continue reading...



Expert Could Testify that Cancer Treatment Caused Long-Term Cognitive Deficits

A three-year-old boy had a stage IV tumor removed. Further surgery was required to remove lymph nodes and his fifth finger to the wrist. Thereafter, the child underwent one month of a high-dose treatment with Interferon-alpha (IFN-a), followed by 11 months of a low-dose IFN-a treatment. Click title to continue reading...



Pharmacy Owed Duty to Not Fill Prescriptions for Too Many Pills in Too Short Time

A man’s doctor diagnosed him with anxiety. The doctor prescribed Xanax (Alprazolam) and Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen or Oxycodone/ Acetaminophen. Over the next twenty-two months, the doctor repeatedly prescribed these drugs before the man should have depleted the preceding prescriptions. A pharmacy filled at least thirty of these prescriptions, all written by the same doctor, without question, even though the prescriptions were issued too closely in time before the man should have exhausted the preceding prescription. Twenty-two months after the initial prescription, the man died due to combined drug intoxication of Alprazolam and Hydrocodone. Click title to continue reading...