Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: May 02, 2016

IN THE NEWS


Behavioral Electrical Stimulation Devices to be Banned

On April 22, 2016, the FDA announced a proposal to ban electrical stimulation devices (ESDs) used for self-injurious or aggressive behavior because they present an unreasonable and substantial risk to public health that cannot be corrected or eliminated through changes to the labeling. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Breathing Monitor Lithium Battery Packs Defective

On April 20, 2016, Medtronic recalled the battery pack used in its Covidien Oridion labeled Capnostream20 and Capnostream20p Patient Monitors. This voluntary recall is being conducted due to a battery manufacturing defect that may increase the risk of thermal damage in the battery pack. The scope of this recall includes battery pack model numbers 016400 and 010520. These packs were manufactured by a contract manufacturer between April 2014 and February 2016. Click title to continue reading...



Nationwide Recall of Hospital Products Based on Lack of Sterility Assurance

On April 19, 2016, Pharmakon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. recalled all lots of sterile products compounded and packaged by Pharmakon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. that remain within expiry due to the FDA’s concern over a lack of sterility assurance and other quality issues. Administration of a drug product intended to be sterile that is compromised may result in serious and potentially life-threatening infections or death. Click title to continue reading...



High Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Noise-Exposed Workers; Most Common Problem

On April 22, 2016, the CDC released a report finding hearing loss is the third most common chronic physical condition in the United States, and is more prevalent than diabetes or cancer. Occupational hearing loss, primarily caused by high noise exposure, is the most common U.S. work-related illness. Approximately 22 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous occupational noise. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Informed Consent Required Even For Treatment Beyond Scope of Emergency Practice

A woman accidentally swallowed a small nail. She went to the emergency room (ER). An ER physician examined her and ordered an x-ray of her stomach. The x-ray confirmed the presence of a foreign body in her stomach, just below her diaphragm. The ER physician discharged the woman prescribing (1) “a high-fiber diet to let the nail pass,” (2) return to the hospital if she had any problems, and (3) follow up with her family doctor in three days. Click title to continue reading...



Failure to Diagnose Tumor Sounds in Medical Malpractice, Not Wrongful Death

A man sought medical attention after experiencing numbness, blurred vision, and headaches. He underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure. A doctor reviewed the MRI but made no diagnosis. Click title to continue reading...



Employer Must Notify Injured Worker of Consequences of Refusing Light Duty Job

A man worked at an automobile factory. He suffered an accidental injury in the course of his employment, affecting his left shoulder and neck. Thirty-three weeks after his injury, a physician furnished by the employer released him to return to work with restrictions. Although the man attempted to return to work, he left his employment three weeks later. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Lyme Disease Expert Exam

As a special feature to our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing an illustrative direct examination of a Lyme disease expert witness for the plaintiff-patient in a failure to diagnose and misdiagnosis malpractice action. In this case, the plaintiff-patient was initially diagnosed with dermatitis, then hypothyroidism, then fibromyalgia. Click title to continue reading...