Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: May 16, 2016

IN THE NEWS


Frozen Foods Listeriosis Outbreak; U.S. and Canada

On May 4, 2016, the FDA announced that the FDA, CDC, and state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of listeriosis identified in March 2016. Listeriosis is a rare but serious illness usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacteria called Listeria monocytogenes. Anyone who experiences fever and muscle aches, sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms, or develops fever and chills while pregnant after eating any of the products listed below should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the potentially contaminated frozen vegetables. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


FDA Warns of Abilify Impulse Control/Binge Problems

On May 3, 2016, the FDA warned that compulsive or uncontrollable urges to gamble, binge eat, shop, and have sex have been reported with the use of the antipsychotic drug aripiprazole (Abilify, Abilify Maintena, Aristada, and generics). These uncontrollable urges were reported to have stopped when the medicine was discontinued or the dose was reduced. These impulse-control problems are rare, but they may result in harm to the patient and others if not recognized. Click title to continue reading...



Hemodialysis System Recall - Defective Conductivity Sensors; Injury to Kidney Patients

On May 4, 2016, B. Braun Medical Inc. recalled the Dialog+ Hemodialysis System due to cracks in conductivity sensors that may allow air to enter into the solution (dialysis fluid or dialysate) used to help filter waste and other excess fluids in the blood. The presence of air in dialysis fluid may lead to improper blood filtration, causing serious adverse health consequences, including death. Click title to continue reading...



Hepatitis C Kills More Americans Than Any Other Infectious Disease

Deaths associated with hepatitis C reached an all-time high of 19,659 in 2014, according to new surveillance data released May 4, 2016, by the CDC. A second CDC study shows that annual hepatitis C-related mortality in 2013 surpassed the total combined number of deaths from 60 other infectious diseases reported to the CDC, including HIV, pneumococcal disease, and tuberculosis. Further, both studies use data from death certificates, which often underreport hepatitis C, so there likely were even more hepatitis C-related deaths than these numbers suggest. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Hospital Liable for Nurses’ Failure to Recognize Perforated Esophagus Post-Myotomy

A woman underwent laparoscopic gastric band surgery to combat her obesity. She developed profound esophageal spasms. Fifteen months after the surgery, she had the gastric lap band removed. She then developed nutcracker esophagus, or hypertensive peristalsis, a dysfunction in which painfully strong contractions of the esophagus adversely affect the delivery of food from the mouth to the stomach. Click title to continue reading...



When Doctor Ordered Bedrails Raised, Bedrail Failure Is Professional Negligence

A woman was attempting to get up from her hospital bed when the latch on the bedrail failed and the rail collapsed, causing her to fall to the floor. Just under two years later, she sued the hospital. Her complaint stated causes of action for general negligence and premises liability. Click title to continue reading...



Absolute Discovery Privilege Applies to RCA Provided to DHS Under Mandatory Reporting

A man fell from his hospital bed, suffered a severe intracerebral hemorrhage and subsequently died. The hospital was required to prepare a root cause analysis (RCA) of the event and file its report with the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Discovery: Hospital-Acquired Infection

As a special feature to our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing a checklist for Interrogatories and Deposition Questions in an action for health provider negligence or malpractice involving a patient’s hospital-acquired infection. Click title to continue reading...