Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: May 30, 2016

IN THE NEWS


Prescribing Skin, Nail Antifungal for Unapproved Uses; Deaths

On May 19, 2016, the FDA warned health care professionals to avoid prescribing the antifungal medicine ketoconazole oral tablets to treat skin and nail fungal infections. Use of this medication carries the risk of serious liver damage, adrenal gland problems, and harmful interactions with other medicines that outweigh its benefit in treating these conditions, which are not approved uses of the drug. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Diabetes Drug; Increased Risk of Leg and Foot Amputations

On May 18, 2016, the FDA advised the public about interim safety results from an ongoing clinical trial that found an increase in leg and foot amputations, mostly affecting the toes, in patients treated with the diabetes medicine canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet). The FDA has not determined whether canagliflozin increases the risk of leg and foot amputations, and the FDA currently is investigating this new safety issue and will update the public when it has more information. Click title to continue reading...



FDA Approves New, Targeted Treatment for Bladder Cancer

On May 18, 2016, the FDA approved Tecentriq (atezolizumab) to treat the most common type of bladder cancer, called urothelial carcinoma. This is the first product in its class (PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors) approved to treat this type of cancer. Click title to continue reading...



Thousands of Public Pools, Hot Tubs Closed Due to Violations

Every year, serious health and safety violations force thousands of public pools, hot tubs, and water playgrounds to close, according to a CDC report. Swimming is a great way to exercise and spend time with family and friends but, as with any form of exercise, there are risks. Inspections of public pools and other aquatic venues enforce standards that can prevent illness, drowning, and pool-chemical–associated injuries such as poisoning or burns. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Failure to Timely Perform Cardiac Catheterization; Case Dismissed

A man was evaluated for recurrent and progressive angina. Three months later he underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA) for his worsening angina. The CTA revealed heavy calcification of the left main coronary artery and left circumflex coronary artery with moderate stenosis. His right coronary artery was moderately calcified with stenosis. Click title to continue reading...



Wound Care RN Not Qualified to Testify on Care Standard for ICU, Generalist RNs; Bed Sores

A woman with a faulty mitral valve, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure was admitted to the hospital. She underwent open-heart surgery lasting over seven hours during which she lay supine. Shortly after the procedure and while in transit to her hospital bed, she suffered a cardiac arrest requiring CPR followed by the insertion of an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP). The IABP was threaded through the femoral artery in her leg to her aorta, requiring that her leg be immobilized. Click title to continue reading...



Exhausting Insurance Coverage Appeals Did Not Preclude Breach of Contract Claim

A man had major medical coverage from an insurer. The policy contained a preexisting conditions limitation. After the man was diagnosed with and began receiving treatment for colon cancer, the insurer denied his claim for benefits, asserting that the colon cancer was a preexisting condition. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Admission Requests: Nosocomial Infection

As a special feature to our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing discovery Requests for Admissions in an action for a nursing facility’s negligence involving a resident’s nosocomial infection (often referred to as a “hospital-acquired infection”). Click title to continue reading...