Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: June 27, 2016

IN THE NEWS


Type II Diabetes Medicines May Cause Kidney Failure, Death

On June 14, 2016, the FDA strengthened the existing warning about the risk of acute kidney injury for the type 2 diabetes medicines canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet) and dapagliflozin (Farxiga, Xigduo XR). Based on recent reports, the FDA revised the warnings on the drug labels to include information about acute kidney injury and added recommendations to minimize this risk. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


FDA Approves Device to Drain Stomach Contents for Weight Loss

On June 14, 2016, the FDA approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. The AspireAssist device should not be used on patients with eating disorders, and it is not intended to be used for short durations in those who are moderately overweight. Click title to continue reading...



Kellogg’s Recalls Snacks for Undisclosed Peanut Residue Due to Flour Supplier

On June 13, 2016, Kellogg Company recalled certain varieties and limited dates of production of Mother's, Keebler, Kellogg's Special K brownies, Murray, and Famous Amos snacks and cookies because they may contain undisclosed peanut residue. Kellogg initiated the recall after its supplier, Grain Craft, recalled wheat flour that has the potential to contain low levels of peanut residue. Click title to continue reading...



Risky Youth Behaviors, Such As E-Cigarette Use by High School Students, Concerning

Cigarette smoking among high school students dropped to the lowest levels since the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) began in 1991, but the use of electronic vapor products, including e-cigarettes, among students poses new challenges according to the 2015 survey results released on June 10, 2016, by the CDC. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Experts Challenged: Did Overdose of Vasopressin for Septic Shock Cause Heart Attack

A woman went to the emergency room (ER) suffering from a then-undiagnosed incarcerated hernia, which occurs when part of the fat or small intestine from inside the abdomen becomes stuck in the groin and cannot go back into the abdomen. The ER physician ordered diagnostic tests, diagnosed an incarcerated hernia with possible bowel obstruction, and attempted to reduce the hernia. Click title to continue reading...



Woman Contracts Hepatitis C During Colonoscopy from Previous Patient

A woman contracted the hepatitis C virus during a colonoscopy performed under anesthesia by a gastroenterologist. An investigation performed by the New York City Department of Health (NYCDOH) discovered that the patient upon whom the gastroenterologist performed a colonoscopy immediately before the woman on the same day was a known hepatitis C patient. It was undisputed that prior to the colonoscopy, the woman showed no signs of being infected with the hepatitis C virus. Click title to continue reading...



Health Insurer Could Not Recover Against No-Fault Insurer for Health Care Payments

A woman sustained personal injuries while operating a vehicle insured by a no-fault automobile insurer. At the time of the accident, the woman also had private health insurance. The woman received medical treatment for her injuries from various medical providers. Although her private health insurer alleged that the bills should have been paid by the no-fault automobile insurer, the medical providers submitted some of their bills for treatment directly to the private health insurer. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Checklist: Genetics Deposition

As a special feature for our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing a Checklist for the deposition of a defendant by the plaintiff in a wrongful life action involving an unsuccessful procedure after genetic testing revealed a risk for an inherited disease. Click title to continue reading...