Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: August 15, 2016

IN THE NEWS


NIH Seeks Comment; Human-Animal Chimera Guidelines

On August 5, 2016, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) requested public comment on a proposal to amend Section IV and Section V of the NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and on the proposed scope of certain human-animal chimera research that will be considered internally by an NIH steering committee to provide programmatic input to the director of the relevant NIH Institute(s) or Center(s) or equivalent NIH officials responsible for funding decisions. This document has a comment period that ends in 29 days on September 6, 2016. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Leaky Pediatric Ventilator Recalled; May Cause Death

On August 5, 2016, the FDA has classified Dräger’s recall of its VenStar Oxylog 3000 disposable pediatric patient breathing circuit as a Class I recall, which is the most serious type of recall. Class I recalls involve situations in which there is a reasonable probability that use of the product will cause serious adverse health consequences or death. Click title to continue reading...



Comfort Shield Barrier Cream Cloths; B. Cepacia Contamination

On August 1, 2016, Sage Products initiated a nationwide recall of one lot of Comfort Shield Barrier Cream Cloths to the distributor and health care facility/user level. The recall is being initiated due to product contamination with the bacteria,Burkholderia cepaciaClick title to continue reading...



Local Transmission of Zika in Miami; CDC Issues First US Travel Advisory

During a telebriefing on August 1, 2016, the CDC announced that the CDC issued a travel advisory and testing recommendations for people who traveled to or live in Wynwood, a neighborhood north of downtown Miami, on or after June 15, 2016, the earliest known date that an individual with Zika became infected. According to the Florida Department of Health (FDH), the14 people confirmed to be infected with the Zika virus likely contracted it through a mosquito bite sustained in the Wynwood neighborhood. The FDH believes local transmissions are still only occurring in the same square mile area of Miami. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Sepsis Wrongful Death; Liposuction and Fat Transfer

A woman underwent a liposuction and fat transfer procedure, also known as fat injection or fat grafting, at a medical spa. Less than a week later she died from septic shock caused by an unknown gram-negative bacteria in her right buttock.

The woman’s estate sued the medical spa and its owner for wrongful death and medical malpractice. The complaint alleged that the bacteria that caused the woman’s death were introduced into her body during the procedure at the medical spa because certain reusable medical equipment was not properly disinfected and sterilized.  Click title to continue reading...



Fracture from Manual Shoulder Dislocation Reduction Attempts

A woman fell and suffered a shoulder injury. She sought treatment at the emergency room (ER). She was seen by a physician’s assistant (PA). The hospital did not have an MRI, so the PA ordered x-rays taken of the woman’s shoulder. The x-ray results were uploaded to the internet and eventually reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. Click title to continue reading...



State Claims Against Medicare Advantage Health Plan Preempted by Medicare Act

A man enrolled in a private health plan offering benefits to persons 65 and over as well as disabled persons under the federally funded Medicare Advantage program. He went to an urgent care center outside of the plan’s network for medical services. As a result, he was forced to pay a $50 copayment instead of the $30 copayment for in-network centers. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Motion: Expert Impeachment and Stroke

As a special feature for our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing an illustrative Motion in Limineto exclude material to be used to impeach the plaintiff’s expert in this medical malpractice action for negligence in the defendant doctors’ care and treatment of the plaintiff patient, which caused the plaintiff patient to sustain a stroke from venous thromboembolic disease. Click title to continue reading...