Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: February 20, 2017

IN THE NEWS


Corticosteroid for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Approved

On February 9, 2017, the FDA approved Emflaza (deflazacort) tablets and oral suspension to treat patients age five years and older with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder that causes progressive muscle deterioration and weakness. Emflaza is a corticosteroid that works by decreasing inflammation and reducing the activity of the immune system. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Permanent Injunction Against Dietary Supplement Distributor; DMAA in Products

On February 9, 2017, the Central District of California entered a consent decree of permanent injunction between the United States and VivaCeuticals Inc., doing business as Regeneca Worldwide, and its owner, Matthew A. Nicosia, a California distributor of dietary supplements. Click title to continue reading...



Syringe Pump Recall; Alarm Error May Cause Fatal Therapy Interruption

On February 10, 2017, CareFusion recalled the Alaris Syringe Pump because of a faulty Air-In-Line (AIL) sensor which may generate a false alarm, and cause the syringe pump to stop supplying the infusion to the patient. If the AIL sensor is faulty, the false alarm may be repeated and require the health care provider to clear the alarm to restart the infusion. Interruption of infusion could lead to serious adverse health consequences or death. Click title to continue reading...



New Study: Noise-Related Hearing Loss Not Limited to Work Exposure

A new study published by the CDC on February 7, 2017, reported that approximately one in four U.S. adults who say their hearing is good or excellent actually have hearing damage. Much of this damage is from loud sounds encountered during everyday activities at home and in the community. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Hospital Not Liable for ER Doctor’s Failure to Diagnose Aortic Aneurysm

A 30-year-old man presented to his primary care physician complaining of a lump in his throat that would not go away. The primary care physician recommended that the man undergo an upper endoscopy, a procedure in which a thin tube with a camera and light on the end is inserted through the patient’s mouth and into the esophagus so that the doctor can visualize the esophagus, stomach, and first part of the small intestine. Click title to continue reading...



Medical Device Manufacturers Have Duty to Warn Hospitals

The manufacturer of a robotic surgical device for laparoscopic surgeries required that surgeons perform two supervised surgeries as part of training on the device. The manufacturer provided to doctors a user’s manual that contained various warnings related to the device. Click title to continue reading...



City, Ambulance Service Immune Beyond Insurance for Mishandled 911 Call

A mother was driving a car in which her son was a passenger. The woman lost control of the vehicle and drove it into a retaining pond. The boy nearly drowned. The mother called 911 seeking rescue services. Subsequently, the boy died of pneumonia complicated by the anoxic encephalopathy that occurred in the near drowning event. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Complaint: Gestational Diabetes-Driving Accident

As a special feature for our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing an illustrative Complaint by a third party, who was injured in an auto accident, for physician malpractice. The plaintiff alleges that the physician’s failure to warn a patient with severe gestational diabetes against driving resulted in the third party’s injury in an auto accident caused when the patient became unconscious due to the patient’s low blood glucose level. Click title to continue reading...