Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: March 13, 2017

IN THE NEWS


First Treatment for Frequent Urination at Night

On March 3, 2017, the FDA approved Noctiva (desmopressin acetate) nasal spray for adults who awaken at least two times per night to urinate due to a condition known as nocturnal polyuria, overproduction of urine during the night. Noctiva is the first FDA-approved treatment for this condition. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Drug for Nasal Inflammation from House Dust Mite Allergies

On March 1, 2017, the FDA approved Odactra, the first allergen extract to be administered under the tongue (sublingually) to treat house dust mite (HDM)-induced nasal inflammation (allergic rhinitis), with or without eye inflammation (conjunctivitis), in people 18 through 65 years of age. Click title to continue reading...



Drug Approved to Treat Uncontrolled Diarrhea from Carcinoid Syndrome

On February 28, 2017, the FDA approved Xermelo (telotristat ethyl) tablets in combination with somatostatin analog (SSA) therapy for the treatment of adults with carcinoid syndrome diarrhea that SSA therapy alone has inadequately controlled. Click title to continue reading...



Twenty-Fold Increase in U.S. Birth Defects After Zika Infection Introduced

A CDC report published on March 3, 2017, found that the proportion of Zika-affected pregnancies with birth defects was approximately 20-fold higher compared with the proportion of pregnancies seen in 2013-2014, which is before Zika was introduced into the Americas. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Abdominal Compartment Syndrome; Informed Consent and Medical Malpractice

A man consulted a surgeon regarding a large recurrent incisional hernia, a protrusion of tissue or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained caused by an incompletely-healed surgical wound. The surgeon recommended incisional hernia repair surgery. Click title to continue reading...



Failure to Diagnose Melanoma Claim Barred by Statute of Limitations

A man presented to a physician’s assistant (PA) with a lesion on his left heel. The PA diagnosed the lesion as an infected wart, prescribed antibiotic ointment, and instructed the man to return for a follow-up appointment, scheduled for two weeks later. The man did not attend the follow-up appointment. Click title to continue reading...



Administrative Assessment of Treating Physician’s Opinion and Judicial Review

A woman applied for supplemental security income (SSI) benefits alleging she had been disabled. After the Social Security Administration initially denied her claim, the woman received a hearing with an administrative law judge (ALJ). The ALJ evaluated the woman’s testimony and the medical opinions of a consulting physician, a state-agency physician, an examining psychologist, and a state-agency psychologist. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Opening Statement: Gestational Diabetes Treatment Malpractice

As a special feature for our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing an illustrative Opening Statement for a medical malpractice action regarding the treatment of gestational diabetes. In this illustrative case, the plaintiff mother sued the defendant hospital and two physicians alleging, among other things, medical malpractice on the part of the physicians in treating the plaintiff mother for her gestational diabetes, and for the failure to deliver the plaintiff infant by means of a Caesarean section. Click title to continue reading...