Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: October 16, 2017

IN THE NEWS


First Screening Test of Blood Donations for Zika Virus

On October 5, 2017, the FDA approved the cobas Zika test, a qualitative nucleic acid test for the detection of Zika virus RNA in individual plasma specimens obtained from volunteer donors of whole blood and blood components and from living organ donors. It is intended for use by blood collection establishments to detect Zika virus in blood donations, not for the individual diagnosis of Zika virus infection. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Blinding from Compounded Antibiotic Eye Injections; Cataract Surgery

On October 3, 2017, the FDA reported that it had received from a physician an adverse event report on August 14, 2017, concerning a patient who was diagnosed postoperatively with bilateral hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV) after being administered injections of a compounded triamcinolone, moxifloxacin, and vancomycin (TMV) formulation in each eye at the conclusion of cataract surgery procedures that were performed two weeks apart. Click title to continue reading...



New Implantable Device to Treat Moderate to Severe Sleep Apnea

On October 6, 2017, the FDA approved a new treatment option for patients who have been diagnosed with moderate to severe central sleep apnea. The Remede System is an implantable device that stimulates a nerve located in the chest that is responsible for sending signals to the diaphragm to stimulate breathing. Click title to continue reading...



Overweight, Obesity Associated with 40% of Cancers

On October 3, 2017, the CDC released a report that found that overweight and obesity are associated with an increased risk of 13 types of cancer. These cancers account for about 40 percent of all cancers diagnosed in the United States in 2014. Overall, the rate of new cancer cases has decreased since the 1990s, but increases in overweight- and obesity-related cancers are likely slowing this progress. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Failure to Dilute IV Antihistamine; FDA Pamphlet Not Impeachment Evidence

A woman presented to the emergency room (ER) complaining of nausea, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The woman was provided with an intravenous drip of saline administered via a port on the back of the woman’s left-hand. Subsequently, the woman was treated with two, undiluted, 12.5 mg doses of Phenergan, an antihistamine used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting related to certain conditions. Click title to continue reading...



Expert Witnesses May Testify Woman’s Dentures in Mouth While Choking

A 92-year-old woman underwent surgery at a medical center. The woman regularly used two sets of dentures. After surgery, while still in the hospital, the woman was served breakfast. The woman choked on a pancake and died. Click title to continue reading...



Accidental Dismemberment Policy Did Not Cover Eye Infection, Loss

A man traveled to West Texas for work. While there, the man contracted a fungal infection that disseminated to the right eye. Infection was diagnosed as coccidioidomycosis, an infection also known as valley fever, caused by inhaling the spores of the fungus Coccidioides,which is found in West Texas. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Compelling Physical Exam: Steroid Injection Malpractice

As a special feature for our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing an illustrative motion to compel the physical examination of the plaintiff in a malpractice action involving the administration of steroid injections. In this illustrative situation, a man being treated for severe back pain was administered multiple lumbar epidural steroid injections. The man developed bacterial meningitis. Click title to continue reading...