Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: January 29, 2018

IN THE NEWS


Mitigating Ongoing Shortages of IV Solutions

On January 16, 2018, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., provided an update on the FDA’s efforts to mitigate ongoing shortages of intravenous (IV) solutions, including asking companies to submit data to extend expiration dates for IV products affected by the shortages. Consequently, on January 22, 2018, the FDA alerted health care professionals that Baxter Healthcare Corporation had extended the shelf life of some IV products it manufactured so they may be used beyond the labeled expiration date. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Wearable External Defibrillator Warning; Failure to Provide Shock

On January 17, 2018, the FDA provided information and recommendations regarding the Zoll LifeVest 4000 due to concerns that the device may fail to deliver treatment to the patient if the device is not replaced soon after displaying the message, “Call for service: Device has a problem that may require service. Click title to continue reading...



Laxative Bottles Containing Naproxen; Nationwide Recall

On January 22, 2018, Magno-Humphries Laboratories, Inc., recalled one lot of Basic Drugs Brand of Senna Laxative tablets, 8.6mg Sennosides, due to a customer complaint that their bottle labeled as Senna Laxative actually contained Basic Drugs Brand of Naproxen Sodium 220mg. Click title to continue reading...



Huge Increase in ADHD Prescriptions Filled by Reproductive-Age Women

On January 18, 2018, the CDC published a report that found the number of privately insured U.S. women ages 15 to 44 years who filled a prescription for a medicine to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increased 344 percent between 2003 and 2015. Even higher increases in the rate of prescriptions for ADHD medicine were reported for women in their late 20s and early 30s. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Punitive Damages; Doctor Attempts to Evade Liability; Destroys Notes

A five-year-old girl went to a pediatrician for a checkup. The pediatrician referred the girl to a pediatric endocrinologist because the girl’s blood sugar level was high. The pediatric endocrinologist saw the girl three times over a period of three months. The pediatrician saw the girl once during that three-month period and again approximately one month after the girl’s last appointment with the pediatric endocrinologist. Click title to continue reading...



Failed Knee Replacement; Defense Verdict Reasonable

A 62-year-old man suffered from progressively worsening pain in both knees. An orthopedic surgeon performed a partial replacement of the man’s right knee. Fifteen months later, the orthopedic surgeon performed a total right knee replacement. The man voiced no complaints about the right knee surgery. Click title to continue reading...



Hospital Improperly Balance Billed Patient after Insurer Paid

A man was hospitalized for four days. The man consulted with the man’s health insurer to confirm that the treatment and stay at the hospital would be covered. The health insurer’s third party administrator approved the man’s four days of care at the hospital. The hospital issued a bill to the insurer in the amount of $19,444.98 for services rendered to the man. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Complaint: Unnecessary Cardiac Procedure

As a special feature for our Premium subscribers we have included this feature containing an illustrative complaint involving an unnecessary cardiac procedure. The complaint includes two counts: failure to obtain informed consent and negligent hiring and supervision. In this illustrative situation, a man received a cardiac catheterization and stent placement procedure. Click title to continue reading...