Scalpel Weekly News

Week of: October 29, 2018

IN THE NEWS


Heart Surgery Infections from Temperature-Controlled Water Systems

On October 18, 2018, LivaNova issued a medical device correction letter to inform customers of actions to take to reduce the risk of cardiac surgery infection associated with the 3T Heater-Cooler Systems. On October 19, 2018, the FDA issued a medical device safety communication to share the information provided by LivaNova. Click title to continue reading...


 
MEDICAL ALERTS


Extended Use Dates to Address Sterile Water for Injection Shortage

Due to intermittent supply interruptions of sterile water for injection, on October 11, 2018, the FDA alerted health care professionals and patients of updated dates through which some sterile water for injection manufactured by Hospira, a Pfizer company, may be used beyond the manufacturer’s labeled expiration date. To help ensure patient safety, these products should have been — and should continue to be — stored as labeled. Click title to continue reading...



Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture Prevention Device Recall; Leaks

On October 15, 2018, Endologix, Inc., recalled its AFX Endovascular AAA System. The Endologix AFX Endovascular AAA System (AFX) is used to treat patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). An AAA occurs when the wall of the body’s largest blood vessel (the aorta) becomes stretched and thin, causing the vessel to bulge or expand. The AFX is a thin polymer tube with a large metal stent on the inside. It is placed inside the aorta so that blood flows through the device instead of the weakened aneurysm. This helps to prevent the aneurysm from increasing in size and bursting (rupturing). The AFX is placed in a patient during a surgical procedure called endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Click title to continue reading...



Acute Flaccid Myelitis Investigation

On October 17, 2018, the CDC briefed the press on the CDC’s investigation of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a rare condition that affects a person’s nervous system, specifically the spinal cord, causing weakness in one or more limbs. Between January 1, 2018, and October 19, 2018, the CDC received reports of 155 patients under investigation (PUIs) and 62 cases have been confirmed as AFM in 22 states. Of the confirmed cases, the average age is about 4 years old. More than 90 percent of the cases are in children age 18 years and younger. Click title to continue reading...


  CASE ALERTS


Failure to Diagnose Lyme Disease

A tick bit a patient’s left ankle and the patient developed a rash and experienced numbness and tingling in the left toe, fatigue, and lower back pain. The patient sought care from a number of health care providers over the subsequent years. Click title to continue reading...



Morphine Overdose Administered During C-Section

A patient delivered a child via Cesarean section (C-section). An anesthesiologist and certified nurse anesthetist (CNA) served on the anesthesia team during the C-section. The CNA administered morphine to the patient to help relieve pain during the C-section. Click title to continue reading...



Trucker Knee Injury from Exiting Tractor Trailer; Total Disability

An employee exited the cab of a tractor trailer between ten and twenty times during an average shift. The cab of the tractor trailer was between four and five feet off the ground. To exit the cab, the employee was required to hold onto a grab bar with the right hand, step backwards down three grated steps, step down onto the ground onto the left leg, and turn and twist to change direction. Click title to continue reading...


FEATURE


Expert Witness Checklist: Meningitis Malpractice

As a special feature for our Premium subscribers, we have included this feature containing a checklist to be used by counsel for the review of medical records in preparation for the filing of a medical malpractice action involving meningitis and a related injury. In this illustrative situation, a man presented at the emergency room with a high fever, dizziness, neck stiffness, and a severe headache. Suspecting meningitis, the emergency room physician ordered a lumbar puncture and test of the man’s cerebrospinal fluid. The emergency room physician did not first order a CT scan or begin intravenous antibiotics. When the cerebrospinal fluid was extracted, pressure decreased and the man’s brain stem herniated, causing central nervous system damage. The man sued the emergency room physician for malpractice. Party identifying information has been redacted to protect privacy. Click title to continue reading...